Thursday, March 17, 2011

Tropical Traditions Review and Giveaway

I've had the pleasure of reviewing Tropical Traditions Coconut Oil. At first I was a little skeeved honestly but after using it to make yummy pork chops on the grill I'm hooked. Even my VERY picky hubs likes it.
I made a homemade Pineapple Upside down cake today and instead of using butter I used the Tropical traditions coconut oil. OH.MY. GOODNESS!!! It tasted so much better and gave the pineapple upside down cake so much more "tropical" flavor!

Here's a bit about coconut oil:

Refined Coconut Oil


Most commercial grade coconut oils are made from copra. Copra is basically the dried kernel (meat) of the coconut. It can be made by: smoke drying, sun drying, or kiln drying , or derivatives or a combination of these three. If standard copra is used as a starting material, the unrefined coconut oil extracted from copra is not suitable for consumption and must be purified, that is refined. This is because the way most copra is dried is not sanitary. The standard end product made from copra is RBD coconut oil. RBD stands for refined, bleached, and deodorized. High heat is used to deodorize the oil, and the oil is typically filtered through (bleaching) clays to remove impurities. Sodium hydroxide is generally used to remove free fatty acids and prolong shelf life. This is the most common way to mass-produce coconut oil. The older way of producing refined coconut oil was through physical/mechanical refining (see Tropical Traditions Expeller Pressed Coconut Oil.). More modern methods also use chemical solvents to extract all the oil from the copra for higher yields.

RBD oil is also sometimes hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated. This happens mostly in tropical climates, since the natural melting point of coconut oil is about 76 degrees F, and already naturally a solid in most colder climates. Since coconut oil is mostly saturated, there is little unsaturated oil left to hydrogenate. Hydrogenated oils contain trans fatty acids.

Virgin Coconut Oil

There is no industry standard definition for "Virgin Coconut Oil" as there is in the olive oil industry for "Virgin" and "Extra Virgin" olive oil. Today, there are many coconut oils on the market that are labeled as "Virgin Coconut Oil." Tropical Traditions was the first company to publish standards for the use of "Virgin Coconut Oil" in terms of edible oils, and here is what we published over eight years ago:
Virgin Coconut Oil can only be achieved by using fresh coconut meat or what is called non-copra. Chemicals and high heating are not used in further refining, since the natural, pure coconut oil is very stable with a shelf life of several years. There are currently two main processes of manufacturing Virgin Coconut Oil:

1. Quick drying of fresh coconut meat which is then used to press out the oil. Using this method, the coconut meat is quick dried, and the oil is then pressed out via mechanical means. This is the most common type of "Virgin" or "Extra Virgin" (see below) coconut oil sold in the market today that you will find in stores. It is mass-produced. (see our Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil)
2. Wet-milling. With this method the oil is extracted from fresh coconut meat without drying first. "Coconut milk" is expressed first by pressing. The oil is then further separated from the water. Methods which can be used to separate the oil from the water include boiling, fermentation, refrigeration, enzymes and mechanical centrifuge. (see our Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil)
Small video about Tropical Traditions:





And the best part is that 1 lucky reader is going to win their own jar of Coconut Oil!!
 
MANDATORY ENTRY:
1- Follow me via GFC
2-Subscribe to Tropical Traditions newsletter here
Additional entries:
3- Follow Party of 5 on facebook

That's it!
Giveaway will close on 3/31/11 @ 12pm EST and will be choosen by random.org

** All opinions are my own. I was not paid for this review. I was sent a product to sample**
CONTEST CLOSED
RANDOM.ORG GENERATED #7.
CLAUDIA!!! CONGRATS!

13 comments:

Domestic Diva said...

I follow on gfc

lovelydomesticdiva (at) gmail (dot) com

Domestic Diva said...

I subscribe to TT newsletter.

lovelydomesticdiva (at) gmail (dot) com

Katie said...

I follow via GFC

Katie said...

I get the newsletter

Dee said...

I subscribe to TT newsletter.

Claudia said...

I Follow you on Google Friend Connect
nclaudia25 at yahoo dot com

Claudia said...

I Subscribed by email to the Tropical Traditions Sales Newsletter
nclaudia 25 at yahoo dot com

Claudia said...

I Like your blog on Facebook
(claudia n)
nclaudia 25 at yahoo dot com

WinItMama said...

I follow via GFC!
winitmama@gmail.com

WinItMama said...

I subscribe to Tropical Traditions newsletter!
winitmama@gmail.com

WinItMama said...

I follow Party of 5 on facebook!
winitmama@gmail.com

Martha said...

Following you via GFC

Martha said...

Following you on twitter
@hollinsgirl7